Pacific Crest Trail 2017 Full Gear List

The Big Three: Backpack, Tent, and Sleeping Bag/Pad.

Backpack

Crossing Evolution Creek Meadow

Zpacks Arc Blast 60L, Medium Torso Height , Medium Belt.

No side pockets, hydration port, side compression straps, or base straps. Shock cord added for Smartwater bottles and safety pins added to hang drying clothes on the pack.

21.4 ounces.

Tent

Zpacks Hexamid Solo-Plus tent up in Piute Canyon, Sierra.

Zpacks Hexamid Solo-Plus

Cuben fiber twin ground sheet with an additional mesh pocket added.

22 ounces.

Sleeping Bag

Katabitic Palisade 30F

Katabatic Palisade 30F Quilt

Size Regular (6′) using the strap system, not the cord system. I don’t use the included stuff sack. Instead I use Zpack’s Pillow Stuff Sack.

19.2 ounces.

Sleeping Pad

Thermarest NeoAir XLite

Size Large, Seam Grip dots added on both sides to help grip the tent floor and sleeping bag.

13.2 oz. (Storage sack included)

Here’s where you can buy both items:

Therm-a-rest NeoAir XLite
Seam Grip Repair Adhesive and Sealant

Sleeping Clothes

Down Hood

Zpacks Down Hood

Zpacks Down Hood (made by GooseFeetGear)

Works really well with quilts. I toss and turn when I sleep, so this keeps my head warm without getting tangled in my sleeping bag.

1.5 ounces.

Pillow

Zpacks Pillow Stuff Sack, inside out and ready for sleeping.

Zpacks Pillow Stuff Sack

Very big stuff sack. I use this one sack for my sleeping bag, sleeping thermals, down hood, and down jacket. At night, I flip it inside out and stuff with my down jacket and dry clothes.

2 ounces.

Thermal Top and Bottom

Terramar Thermasilk Crew Neck Top

Works well. Its best attribute is its weight, but not terribly warm. Just enough of a layer to keep skin from sticking to skin. Size: Medium.

3.3 ounces.

Terramar Thermasilk Pant

Jury is still out on these. Super light, but basically glorified pantyhose. Not very warm, but it keeps skin off of skin. Size: Medium.

3 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy both items:

Terramar Men’s Thermasilk Crew Neck Top
Terramar Men’s Thermasilk Pant

Wool Socks

Darn Tough Men’s 1/4 Merino Wool Socks

Darn Tough Vermont Merino Wool Socks

Surprisingly thin, comfy, and warm. Merino wool keeps the odor at bay. I use one of these for sleeping and another two pairs to hike in. The customer service at Darn Tough is apparently amazing.

2.3 ounces (per pair for size 11).

Here’s where you can buy these socks:

Darn Tough Vermont Men’s 1/4 Merino Wool Cushion Hiking Socks

Hiking Clothes

Base Wool T-shirt

Minus 33 Merino Wool T-Shirt

Breathable, warm, light, but a bit pricey. It’s important to have merino wool next to your skin. Size: Medium.

6 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this shirt:

Minus33 Merino Wool Men’s Algonquin Lightweight Short Sleeve Crew

Mid-layer Long Sleeve Shirt

Mountain Hardwear Merino Long Sleeve

Layer to add if the conditions get chilly. Size: Medium.

7 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this shirt:

Mountain Hardwear Integral Pro Long Sleeve Tee

Pants

ExOfficio Amphi Convertible Pants

These aren’t the exact model I’ve been hiking in, but they’re the updated version of my pants. I’m a big fan of convertible pants and having cargo pockets. The material dries quickly, important after creek crossings late in the day. Size 30.

12.9 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy these pants:

ExOfficio Men’s Amphi Convertible Pants

Underwear

ExOfficio Boxer Briefs

I usually am a boxer kind of guy, but the bunching (and resulting chafing) while hiking make boxer briefs the way to go.

2.9 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this comfy underwear:

ExOfficio Boxer Brief

Wool Socks

Darn Tough Men’s 1/4 Merino Wool Socks

Darn Tough Vermont Merino Wool Socks

Surprisingly thin, comfy, and warm. Merino wool keeps the odor at bay. I use one of these for sleeping and another two pairs to hike in. The customer service at Darn Tough is apparently amazing.

2.3 ounces (per pair for size 11).

Here’s where you can buy these socks:

Darn Tough Vermont Men’s 1/4 Merino Wool Cushion Hiking Socks

Down Jacket

Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer

Crazy light and surprisingly warm. It’s a delicate jacket though, and fairly pricey. The hood is essential. At night this jacket lives in my pillow stuff sack to make a down pillow. Size: Medium.

8 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this jacket:

Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer Down Hooded Jacket

Ballcap

Trusty American Alpine Club hat.

American Alpine Club Hat

Pretty generic trucker-style hat. Used mainly for sun protection and to cover up the greasy nightmare that occurs after a week without a shower. Probably could find something lighter, but this hat and I have history…

2.5 ounces.

Gloves

Zpacks Possom Down Gloves

 

Zpacks Possumdown Gloves

Super light, warm when wet, and they don’t hold on to water.

1.5 ounces.

Buff

Buff Brand Buff

Very versatile piece of gear. Useful for warmth and sun cover.

1.3 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy pretty much any style of Buff imaginable:

BUFF Original Multifunctional Headwear

Gaiters

Dirty Girl Gaiters

Silly name, but they do the job, don’t weigh anything, and they’re super durable.

1.1 ounces.

Shoes

Altra Lone Peak 3.0

Super wide toe box, very comfortable. Although you’re lucky to get more than a few hundred miles out of them… The standard insoles leave my feet pulverized after high mileage days. I add in some Superfeet Carbon insoles to help.

24.2 ounces (per pair)

Here’s a link to buy these amazing shoes:

Altra Men’s Lone Peak 3.0

Here’s where you can buy the Superfeet Carbon insoles:

Superfeet Carbon Premium Insoles

Trekking Poles

Black Diamond Trail Back Poles

High quality, relatively inexpensive, and very durable. There are much lighter options, but for beefier fellas (like myself), a solid trekking pole is a must. One of these are also used to set up my shelter.

20.6 ounces (per pair).

Here’s where you can buy these sturdy poles:

Black Diamond Trail Back Trekking Pole

Rain Gear

Rain Jacket

Marmot Precip Rain Jacket

Waterproof/breathable fabric, which requires some care to refresh the DWR (Durable Water Repellent) finish on the jacket every so often. Size: Medium.

7 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this jacket:

Men’s Precip Jacket

Rain Pants

White Sierra Trabagon Pants

Light, waterproof material that packs into one of the pant’s pockets. I used to leave these at home, but hiking in windy, wet, cold conditions is MUCH more tolerable with dry legs. Size: Medium.

6.2 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy these rain pants:

White Sierra Men’s Trabagon Pants

Umbrella

Liteflex Umbrella

Mainly this will be used for shade through the California deserts. Shock cord on my shoulder straps allow this gear to provide sun/rain protection hands-free.

8.1 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this umbrella:

Liteflex Trek Umbrella

Electronics

Battery Pack

Anker PowerCore 10,000

Possibly the best mAh to weight ratio among portable battery packs. Provides enough power to charge my Samsung Galaxy S7 phone and my Delorme Inreach in between resupplies.

6.9 ounces (including charging cord, USB to micro-USB)

Here’s where you can buy this battery pack:

Anker PowerCore 10000, One of the Smallest and Lightest 10000mAh External Batteries

GPS/SOS Device

Delorme InReach Explorer

For peace of mind, communication, weather reports, and navigation gear. The InReach packs a punch well worth its weight, but it’s definitely expensive to both initially purchase and then pay for the monthly subscription charges.

6.8 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy the InReach:

DeLorme InReach Explorer Two Way Satellite Communicator

Phone

Samsung Galaxy S7

The S7 has great battery life on airplane mode, is water resistant, and is an endless source of information. I’ll mainly be using Guthook’s PCT and Hikerbot apps to stay informed on the trail. I’ll also be using Earthmate, which pairs with the InReach to more easily send out messages and navigate.

6.3 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this phone:

Samsung Galaxy S7 32GB

Power Cube Wall Charger

RAVPower Power Cube

This cube has two ports, one of which supports Qualcomm Quick Charge 2.0 for my Samsung S7 phone. These chargers are important gear for speeding up charging times during resupply stops in town.

3.4 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this charger:

RAVPower Quick Charge 2.0 30W

Headlamp

Black Diamond Storm

Super bright, but admittedly outdated and heavier gear than what I could have.

3.4 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this headlamp:

Black Diamond Storm Head Lamp

Here’s the current version of this headlamp:

Black Diamond Storm Headlamp

Camera/Video

GoPro Hero 4 Silver

Using for camera/video along the way. Essential experience-recording gear. It’ll stay in a waterproof/shockproof case. There’s newer versions of this GoPro out.

6.46 ounces (including charging cable).

Here’s where you can buy this GoPro:

GoPro HERO4 Silver

Water Filtration and Storage

Water Filtration

Sawyer Squeeze

I’ll bring one of these along along with the included plunger for when you have to filter… chunky… water sources. I don’t use the bags that come with the filter, I’ve had them start leaking on me within a week in the backcountry. Instead, I use Smartwater bottles for transporting water, which the Sawyer Squeeze threads on top of. That way, I have one perma-dirty water bottle with the filter threaded on top and one clean water bottle to filter water into.

3.7 ounces (with plunger).

Here’s where you can buy this awesome little filter:

Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter System

Water Storage

Smartwater bottle attachment

Smartwater 1 Liter Water Bottles

Lightweight, tough, disposable, and fairly easy to find. Sawyer filters thread on top of these leak-tight. They can take many, many filtering sessions, but they have a tendency to crack when dropped. I use some nylon string tied around the top with a small carabiner to attach to my pack.

1.6 ounces (with carabiner).

Here’s where you can buy these water bottles:

Smartwater, 1 Liter Bottle

Cooking, Fuel, and Food Storage

Stove System

Trail Designs Caldera Cone system with a 850 mL Toaks titanium pot.

Trail Designs Caldera Cone

Very light. Can be used with either alcohol or Esbit tabs. Boils two cups of water in about 8 minutes. Cone has some channels that need care taken of for assembly. Each cone is custom-made for your pot.

  • Cone and case: 5 ounces.
  • Alcohol can stove: 0.53 ounces.
  • Alcohol, plus matches to light: ~0.5 ounces/meal
  • Esbit Gram Cracker stand: 0.1 ounce
  • Esbit Fuel Tab: 0.5 ounces/meal.

Lighter

Bic Mini Lighter

Reliable, cheap, and super light. My one complaint is that using them with frozen hands is almost impossible.

0.4 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy these little lighters online:

Lot of 5 Bic Mini

Pot

Toaks 850 ml Pot

More than enough capacity to boil water for dinner and have a hot drink with it. The 850ml version isn’t exactly the same as the one pictured, but it’s pretty similar.

Here’s where you can buy the 750ml version:

TOAKS Titanium 750ml Pot

Spoon

Toaks Titanium Long Handle Spoon

Light and long to avoid dinner all over your knuckles when eating out of ziplock bags (my preferred dining method). The polished bowl makes cleaning much easier.

0.8 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this awesome spoon:

TOAKS Titanium Long Handle Spoon with Polished Bowl

Food Storage

OPSAK Bags

Odor proof to keep critters from messing with your food. I primarily use the 12″x20″ size. Very heavy duty.

1.6 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy a variety pack of these bags:

OPSAK Odor-Proof Bags

Backcountry Hygiene

Anti-Chafe

Bodyglide

For all those spots that just aren’t gliding, because hiking bowlegged for 2660 miles just isn’t an option…

1.5 ounces.

Bodyglide Original Anti-Chafe Balm

Toothbrush/Toothpaste

Zpacks Toothbrush and Mini Toothpaste

Many of the ultralight toothbrushes I’ve tried just don’t cut it. Too flimsy, too small, handle too short etc. This little combo from Zpacks seems to be the sweet spot between invisible weight and utility. The toothpaste tube holds 4-5 days worth of toothpaste and is refillable.

0.3 ounces.

Towel


Lightload Towel

Starting as a small puck (green disk in the picture), you add water to these awesome little camp towels and they unfold into a big and surprisingly durable towel.

0.6 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy these towels:

Lightload Towels

Moisturizing Salve

Joshua Tree Salve

A general moisturizer for hands, feet, lips, and whatever else might need it.

0.5 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this salve:

Joshua Tree Organic Healing Salve

Hand Sanitizer

Purell

With how disgusting hands get in the backcountry, it’s a good idea to bring something along that can kill off the germs.

2.4 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy this sanitizer:

Purell Hand Sanitizer

Laundry

Gallon Zip-Lock with Camp Soap

I’m usually a strong opponent to soap in the backcountry in any form, but for the southern 700 miles where water is more scarce, I’ll use a gallon bag with a sheet of camp suds to agitate and clean clothes. This will allow the limited water to be used more efficiently for cleaning without returning the water to a low-flowing or stagnant source of water. I dump the dirty water far from the source (greater than 100 feet). Soap doesn’t belong in areas with plenty of water flow to rinse laundry/dishes/etc. like the Sierra or Cascades.

0.5 ounces.

Here’s where you can buy these items:

Ziploc Freezer Bag- Gallon
Coleman Dish and Hands Camp Soap Sheets

First Aid Kit

From top left to bottom right:

Total weight: 6.4 ounces.

Miscellaneous Gear

Repair Kit

From top left to bottom right:

Total weight: 1.4 ounces

Other Miscellaneous

From top left to bottom right:

Total weight: 22.5 ounces.